News of a stamp
José Manuel Bouzas

If who controls the past, controls the future, who controls the present, controls the past?

Georges Orwell

The providential appearance of the C.F. Mazas print that is now being presented, more or less a month and a half after the opening of the exhibition on the magazine We18 March, 2022

Until not so long ago, Mazas was irrelevant or, at most, he was considered an epigone, an upstart. Now, and after so much effort by some and not a few mockery, he is claimed as a dispenser of avant-garde indulgence that is so necessary to uncouth gregariousness and dandruff as an emollient and cosmetic ointment.

Despite the celebratory pomp of the Generation We, there seems to be unanimous agreement that the aesthetic and plastic aspects of said generation 18 March, 2022

Someone as little suspicious of deviationism as Luis Seoane said that: “The previous generation of Castelao, Risk and Otero Pedrayo remained relatively foreign to these events and the magazine as we daily problems in literary, was not in the visual arts.1”María Victoria Carballo-Calero Ramos and Jorge Varela Barrio, cannot but collect the same opinion2.

When in 2002 the anthological exhibition of the centenary of Cándido Fernández Mazas was presented at the Círculo de Bellas Artes in Madrid, aware of the difficulty that had guided the recovery of his work, we commented that, any future incorporation into corpus Of the same 18 March, 2022 generation?

Until 1996, when he died, this task of recovering and collecting vestiges was mainly carried out by Armando Fernández Mazas, the painter's brother. From there and with greater or lesser fortune - as for example in the case of this work provided exclusively by chance - it has been doing what circumstances, means and time (also luck, bad luck) have done. permitted.

With perspective, things usually seem easy –so obvious– but it is only fair to remember that Armando, in his efforts to recover the figure of his brother and his work back in the eighties, was considered little less than a crazy old man who it came to stir up a past that was scarcely convenient for some and for others; It also brought to the present the memory of all those (perhaps too many) who were close to him and his brother (perhaps inconvenient, perhaps deliberately forgotten even today, perhaps many of them were murdered) and who forced him to beg for space in the press, where he barely managed to publish and only in the local editions of The voice of Galicia and of The Vigo Lighthouse with little impact. The institutions went to other things.

All this must be added to immovable cultural and ideological structures that made it impossible –and make it impossible– to recover everything that happened with justice and without manipulation. A gap is allowed, as now, as long as there is a minimal possibility of profit or prestige or that the established criteria can continue to be established. I mean the unquestionable agreement on the Xeration We endorsed from absolutely the entire ideological arc, an agreement that –apparently– the stamp of Mazas would come to consolidate even more, with a reason similar to: ––see?, we already told you, we were like this: modern, considerate, capable, cosmopolitan .

All this must be added to immovable cultural and ideological structures that made it impossible –and make it impossible– to recover everything that happened with justice and without manipulation. A gap is allowed, as now, as long as there is a minimal possibility of profit or prestige or that the established criteria can continue to be established. I mean the unquestionable agreement on the X

FINDINGS

In recent years some things have appeared, some questionable and very difficult to legitimize not only because of what is evident when contemplating them, but also because of their swampy and dark origin; others, it is almost impossible to determine the journey they traveled from the painter's hands to the merchants who move them and would require a detailed and attentive analysis as to their drift and why. But that matters very little to sellers, buyers, intermediaries, messengers and recipients, because it costs love, dedication, time, work and also money.

(Image 1) Lucía Sánchez Saornil, 1933

Over time, the occasional article has also been appearing, such as the one that contains reproductions of drawings that Armando searched for the originals with so much effort; almost impossible task, due to the circumstances of the civil war of 1936-1939, such as those reported in his article, Miguel Ángel Gamonal of the book They3, published at the end of 1938 or beginning of 1939, in the heat of the conflict and whose edition was in the care of the poet and anarchist militant and the collective of Free women Lucia Sánchez Saornil4 (Imag. 1) Over time, the occasional article has also been appearing, such as the one that contains reproductions of drawings that Armando searched for the originals with so much effort; almost impossible task, due to the circumstances of the civil war of 1936-1939, such as those reported in his article, Miguel Ángel Gamonal of the book5.

(Fig. 2) IMMORAL TALE, 1924

While the book They, it does not serve to enrich the analysis of the print that has appeared, and is not but another element that completes the Mazas puzzle, yes another book discovered a few years ago and that had not been included in the catalog of the 2002 anthological exhibition either . Is about Immoral tale scored by Wenceslao Fernández Flórez when we have the information. (Imág. 2)

It is a book from the collection The evening novel endorsed from absolutely the entire ideological arc, an agreement that –apparently– the stamp of Mazas would come to consolidate even more, with a reason similar to: ––see?, we already told you, we were like this: modern, considerate, capable, cosmopolitan . Dichiendorsed from absolutely the entire ideological arc, an agreement that –apparently– the stamp of Mazas would come to consolidate even more, with a reason similar to: ––see?, we already told you, we were like this: modern, considerate, capable, cosmopolitan . oldendorsed from absolutely the entire ideological arc, an agreement that –apparently– the stamp of Mazas would come to consolidate even more, with a reason similar to: ––see?, we already told you, we were like this: modern, considerate, capable, cosmopolitan . The Pueblo Gallego as a kind of cultural and graphic correspondent and it is from there that he is going to send some illustrations to the editorial office of the newspaper in Vigo, such as the portrait of Rafael Cansinos Assens. as a kind of cultural and graphic correspondent and it is from there that he is going to send some illustrations to the editorial office of the newspaper in Vigo, such as the portrait of Rafael Cansinos Assens.Immoral Accountas a kind of cultural and graphic correspondent and it is from there that he is going to send some illustrations to the editorial office of the newspaper in Vigo, such as the portrait of Rafael Cansinos Assens. as a kind of cultural and graphic correspondent and it is from there that he is going to send some illustrations to the editorial office of the newspaper in Vigo, such as the portrait of Rafael Cansinos Assens. will be reproduced later by zinc plates6. as a kind of cultural and graphic correspondent and it is from there that he is going to send some illustrations to the editorial office of the newspaper in Vigo, such as the portrait of Rafael Cansinos Assens.

MAZES AND THEM

We could qualify the relationship of C.F. Mazas with the magazine We like that of a libertarian and internationalist avant-garde who must collaborate with modernists and nationalists. If Vicente Risco was 36 years old in 1920, Alfonso R. Castelao 34 and Ramón Otero Pedrayo 32; Instead, the collaborators of the magazine from the Mazas generation were: Eugenio Montes, 22, Francisco L. Bernárdez, 20, Álvaro de las Casas, 19, Augusto de las Casas, 14, and Mazas, 20. It is not just that CF Mazas belongs to a generation later, but had a more unprejudiced and cosmopolitan vision with respect to other systems and cultural incorporations and was oblivious to the commitment of national construction. His estrangement from We It is produced from 1925, for various reasons that I will analyze later and that will lead to the altercations during the rally in favor of the Statute of Autonomy in 1931 at the Losada Theater, and with the self-publication of its pamphlet As the caravan passes.

The members of the group We -despite their dissensions make up the cultural organ of nationalism, as can be inferred from the texts of the magazine or the correspondence of Risco and other authors that will appear throughout this article.

(Image 3) THE EAGLE

The Galician group considers the magazine The Eagle (Imag. 3)organ of expression of movement Portuguese Renaissance since 1912 (although emerged two years earlier), with a noucentista aesthetic and conservative ideology – sister of We. It will serve as a beacon and guide in the journey of the orensana magazine and many of its collaborators will be invited to participate in this new project launched by V. Risco and A. R. Castelao. At the head of that magazine and that group of intellectuals is the poet Teixeira de Pascoaes, who is the object of the most blushing and servile vassalage, by practically all Galician intellectuals.7

I will not expand, in principle, more than in these two notes to place Mazas in relation to We and to locate the stamp in relation to the origin of its provenance.

The work presented affirms what was already evident even though it had not appeared, that is, that the most avant-garde and novel work was carried out by Mazas in his early years. They aim There are also the illustrations that - paradoxically - are kept at the Vicente Risco Foundation in Allariz. I say paradoxically because although Risco was refractory to these aesthetics, as can be read in his letters to Manoel Antonio where he comments among other things: .. what is done in Spain of this, is worth almost nothing" O well "I am not a supporter of any of these schools. I make poems of these “pour l’Espagne et le Maroc” and send them to the magazine Grecia (Imág. 4) because I am a friend of its director Isaac del Vando Villar, an Andalusian boy of Jewish race, who does not understand any of this, but is dedicated to buying and selling antiques”, He will end up saying that the Galicians do not need any of those ísmos, and he proposes that he forget those whims and begin to study his own folklore, Portuguese saudosismo, or - especially - the ancient and modern Nordic literatures.8 The speech expressed in those letters would complete what he explained in the transcript of his dissertation. New art, collected in Our Earth 114, on March 20, 1920, (Imag. 5) and in which in a didactic way he explains things as "avant-garde" as sensualist Galicianism, the value of alalá –Which recalls his “futuristic” poem published in the previous issue of a Our Earth nº 113,U… ju juu… ”(Imag. 6) as pamphleteer as only the worst poetry usually is, so poor in concept and in poetic images if we compare it with the ultraist poem "Versispatial landscape ” (Imag. 7) by Eugenio Montes, published in the magazine Greece (which Vicente Risco criticized so much) a year before. He talks about the Celtic origin mixed with the Ligurian substratum, about the value of the pork shoulder with turnip greens, or about what Cubism is. He speaks of Picasso, of Bracque(sic), he speaks of critics and painters who are so forgotten today in relation to avant-garde movements such as Metzinger, of the mathematicians Lovatchewsky(sic) or Rieman(sic), of hyperspace, of celestial mechanics, of the Huidobro's creationism –with whom according to his son Antón Risco he corresponded–: Risco considers creationism a form of cubism(?). He talks about Velázquez, who was apparently of Galician origin and would have lived for several years in Galicia(?), about Wateau, about Moreau, about Leonardo da Vinci, about Cervantes –who apparently also had Galician blood–, to spend the rest of the article already talking about “what Castelao says", Which is what I should have talked about from the beginning since the talk was inserted in a course of"Nazonalist conferences at the exhibition of Castelao”. What a stew, it must have blown them away, although the audience would be devoted to listening to what they wanted to hear. There is not in the transcript of the talk a single reference to simultaneism, (Huidobro was a creationist), nor to Orphism, much less to Sonia or Robert Delaunay. Despite by then Risco should already know them according to the book that Huidobro sent him9, (Imag. 8, 9, 10) but apparently not because they were in Galicia or very close to Galicia. If he did not see Teixeira de Pascoaes for whom he had so much admiration until as late as 1927, he will not see the Delaunays. Nor does he mention them when he passes through Paris in the direction of Germany in Central Europe.

(Picture 11) VICENTE RISCO. 20S

Despite everything, Vicente Risco was aware of the value of Mazas's drawings, so he kept them, although always silencing, hiding their author10. Although Risco is the best writer, the best antenna and the most informed of We, it is very far from the avant-garde. Personally, I think it never belonged to them and I am not the only one11. (Im.11.11)

If the magazine We It was far from avant-garde, the conservative attitude of Risco or Castelao eager to start their project, does not prevent artists like Mazas, from doing what they deem appropriate, faithful to their own plastic vision, even if it did not fit into We. As collaborators they always had the door open, they could leave and not contribute more, as it ended up happening this way; But, in the meantime, an intergenerational amalgamation was being made, which was profitable. It is difficult to understand that an illustration - which the editors decided to include as an advertisement for Aguas de Mondariz–12, it would not have been given the importance it deserves considering his quality, having been able to be signed and considered “autonomous art” –as Mazas would define it– and appear, instead, as something utilitarian and instrumental. It is revealing. It is more difficult to understand, therefore, that he was allowed to make the print in color Vella arch13.

In an article published in the newspaper The Pueblo Gallego, Augusto Mª Casas clarifies Vicente Risco's position regarding C.F. Mazas. It is not only that Risco rejected the avant-garde aesthetic, despite the licenses it granted in We or, of the value that privately or intimately he granted - as I have just mentioned - but that he does not like the more classical, more academic pictorial capacity, of the most perfect mastery of anatomy. Therefore, if the inclusion of Arco da Vella in the magazine - or if this is considered a privilege towards Mazas for being the only print reproduced in color in We- It is less understood that the young artist is allowed to publish a drawing so plastically close to the painting to which the local wise men, led by the wisest of all, had gone to "remove the light."14 (Imag.12) It is a beautiful drawing, in its synthetic exactness, in its anatomical perfection, which shows that plastic versatility to which Augusto Casas alludes, made in Paris in 1925 at the Acadèmie de la Grande Chaumière15. (Imag.13) It is easy to deduce, after reading the article by Casas, that what really bothered him was the intellectual and plastic brilliance of Mazas. If as avant-garde ("cubist" the wise men used to say) he was criticized –or pigeonholed–, as possessing a technique in which composition, color, figuration and anatomy were perfect, he was equally criticized.

(Fig. 18) IMMORAL TALE

Taking into account just stylistic and formal aspects it should be located the stamp that is presented between October 1920, date of the presentation of the magazine We and the end of 1926, the date on which he published the last vignettes in The Zarpa. It is, from then on, when Mazas abandons the use of the stain and the mass of color - mainly black - in favor of the line, of which, as has been written on previous occasions, he is the absolute master. Although until almost the end of 1926 he continued to publish in The Zarpa his vignettes made in linoleum (Imags. 14, 15, 16, 17), could be considered the hinge in which the transition from the stain to the line occurs, the illustrations for the book by Wenceslao Fernández Flórez Immoral Account –already alluded to– and in which, if the cover is made in mass and in color, as if it were a woodcut or linoleum, the rest of the illustrations that appear inside will be made with line. (Imág. 18) It is in the period comprised in those 6 years when Mazas executes the most avant-garde illustrations, having to –as time goes by, and trying to professionalize himself as an illustrator– adapt to more conventional proposals, according to the editorial interests and the majority taste of the readers. . Proof of this is that, for the successive editions of Fernández Flórez's book, none of Mazas's illustrations are used again, neither for the cover nor for the interior. Even among the books by Fernández Mazas himself, the first edition illustrated by himself is not preserved, but a later one from 1927 published by Editorial Atlántida, with a cover by Federico Ribas, which, although correct and dynamic, is much more conventional. The book does not have any interior illustration. The original edition of Mazas houses 15.16

POSTERS

Of the very scarce work that Mazas has left - perhaps not so scarce considering that he only lived for 39 years (very random), in which he not only dedicated himself to plastic, but he also left three plays and the outline of a novel - his poster production does not occupy a leading place in terms of quantity (but not quality). Until now, only two posters were known, the print that is presented would therefore become a third of what is known, perhaps the future will bring us more surprises.

One of the posters is an original made in gouache and ink for the Vigo Savings Bank, on an unknown date, and it is noted that it is restricted to typographic provisions and tender specifications. It currently belongs to the collection Abanca Foundation, since at the time it had been donated - with his proverbial generosity - by Armando Fernández Mazas to Vigo Box, knowing the value that it could have for the entity to own it.

Another is the well-known poster of Altarpiece of Puppets made for Misiones Pedagogicas in 1934, and graphically so superior to the one made by Ramón Gaya also for Misiones. It is a pity that there is no original of this poster, because it would allow us to analyze his way of working. That the artist knows the mechanics of printing graphics is very important for the result. Saturated flat colors, lines that do not coincide with the mass of color reinforcing the graphic game, the sober use of color, diagonal planes to reinforce depth, the economy of colors using only two to lower the cost, etc.

To the poster made for Pedagogical Missions María Luisa Sobrino refers in the text that she dedicates to her in her book Poster Design in Galicia and where it comes to say that Galician artists only practiced the avant-garde outside of Galicia and in the years after the proclamation of the Republic17. This print, designed to make a poster, shows that this is not the case, and that, for at least 14 years before and from Ourense, Mazas executed works of a dazzling avant-garde.

(Imag. 19) THE MOON, THE SOUL AND THE BELOVED, 1922

If before 1920, make the two twin cakes Return of the Fair with the same stylistic approaches, although with a completely different technique, with its advantages –the possibility of using half tones–, and the limitations –the rotundity and expressive power offered by the intensity of the mass–; will use this "way" during the early years of the 20s, providing us with the extraordinary works: Orange and black landscape of 1922, made in gouache and ink and therefore in flat colors or, the drawings that are conserved in the Vicente Risco de Allariz foundation, among which are: Horse and jockey, Naked O Figure with cane, mostly made with ink or white or green gouache on black cardboard. The illustrations made for the book by Xabier Bóveda belong to this same stage. The Moon the soul and the beloved from 1922, (Im.19) Y where he uses the same technique as in the print presented, that is to say, execute the plates in linoleum and, later, by means of photomechanical techniques, carry out the industrial printing. This book is one of the most beautiful that have been made in Spain in the first half of the 20th century together with Kindergarten by Francisco Luis Bernárdez from 1923 and also illustrated by Mazas, or, those of The Old Sailor basks in the sun and other tales by Eugenio Montes also from 1923, in which he once again used the linoleum technique to make the cover and interior illustrations. The characters are always the same: men dressed in hats and with corozaswhere he uses the same technique as in the print presented, that is to say, execute the plates in linoleum and, later, by means of photomechanical techniques, carry out the industrial printing. This book is one of the most beautiful that have been made in Spain in the first half of the 20th century together with (Imág.20,21)

(Imag. 22) Portrait of Montes

This type of formal purification, of sophistication, of sublimation of the peasant peoples through geometric synthesis, is the same iridescent delicacy "…. in fringes of suggestive dews”To which Eugenio Montes refers in 1923, in his essay Aesthetic muiñeira, published in We, (Imág.22) or Jesús Bal y Gay in his book Towards a Galician ballet in 1924, and from which José Manuel Rey de Viana is going to take the elements for his ballet, in the most flagrant usurpation of an aesthetic and that will hide its true enunciators (at least some of them, according to the drift of Montes that Mazas discovers in Paris in 1927, and how much damage it will do). And what is worse, having appropriated it from the imposture, it will assimilate it to ideological parameters, and therefore aesthetic, contrary to those of its creators whose claim sometimes collided with a certain prejudice, which has made its redemption difficult – as if they had to redeem themselves from something. This is what happened with Mazas when in the 70s and from the pages of The region Emilio Canda "discovers" it18, or Jesús Bal y Gay on whom Ernesto Halffter casts certain suspicions of lack of commitment to the Republican cause. The incorporation of these elements by Viana: in the scenography, in the lighting, in the costumes, in the folkloric stylization of the Galician Ballet, it made one have the impression of being before the corporeal materialization of illustrations or paintings by Fernández Mazas.

With the same aesthetics, the same technique and the same typographic synthesis, the vignette that Mazas makes for the ex-libris of Xabier Bóveda that appears in his book can be considered De los Pazos Gallegos (Verses of fear and superstition) from 1922. (Imág.23)

It is, however, the vignette that appears in We, to illustrate the announcement of Waters of Mondariz19, already mentioned, the one that It seems be closer to the picture that is presented. Not only because of the time or because of its relationship with We, or by the graphic footprints matching –especially those that appear in both prints in the lower right corner– otherwise by the way opportunistic orientalism - far from the impressionist or post-impressionist experiments that artistically stirred the waters in France at the end of the 19th century, and which were committed to oriental exoticism - but by posing as a graphic pretext the typography of the print or, even as a joke, the characters of the illustration itself. The novels of Sax Rohmer began to be published in 1913. Of the two characters that appear in that bullet –With which he seeks an internationalist proposal away from saudosismo, or from racial, national (Galician or Portuguese), traditionalist and religious claims– one is a black man, the other is an oriental character, with slanted eyes and a huge mustache that falls down. You can also suppose very long nails, that is, it is It was Manchu. (Imág. 24) It is difficult to determine which were the influences of popular art, but the window opened by the cinematographer is liberating, so is the knowledge of popular novels, even in their original English edition, to which Mazas could have had access through Eugenio Montes or by Felipe Fernández Armesto (Augusto Assía). Both were very aware of fashion, cinema, literature, philosophy, art or politics, they traveled a lot and had purchasing power. Spanish film magazines published since 1912, such as Cinema, The Cinematic World, World Cinema, Art and Cinematography, etc.. The influence of popular, literary or cinematographic culture that can be found in Cándido Fernández Mazas –in his adolescence– is recorded by Luis Madriñán in the notes for a biography that he dedicates to him and that remains unpublished.20

ABOUT THE PRINT

(Imag. 25)

Thus the artist counts, between 18 and 21 years old when he makes the print for the poster that is presented. (Imag.25) It could be limited to these three years –from 1920 to 1923 (actually two years and three months) - its realization, if a comprehensive chronology since the appearance of the first issue of the magazine We and the trips of his friends to Portugal and the contacts with Teixeira de Pascoaes, since it is through one of them that Mazas's work arrives in Portugal and at the power of Teixeira, which is where it goes to a private library. The print is of average dimensions: 42.5 x 59.5 cm. if we compare it with the Pedagogical Missions Poster Altarpiece of puppets, whose dimensions are: 53.8 x 75cm. It has been stamped on white industrial recording paper and a weight of less than 80gr. no watermarks. It does not show damp spots or darkening caused by light. Its conservation is very good, despite the folds and wrinkles that it presents - and a small elongated hole, approximately one centimeter, right in the middle - because, apparently, it was stored for many years without being exposed to light. a book and folded on itself.

(Imag. 26)

Surprisingly, and despite this, there are no ink marks on the stamp (which is usual, as there is no protective paper on the colored areas). In books made at the same time, with industrial printing techniques, such as The moon the soul and the beloved(1922), marks can be seen on the previous page when the illustrations are in contact, and the same type of industrial inks are those that are usually used for line printing. Observed the reverse, it shows only the impregnation of the ink on the paper characteristic of high relief techniques and although there is some slight stain, it is usual when being manipulated for printing despite all the precautions that are taken or used. "castanets"21. (Im.26) You are missing a very small piece of paper in the lower left corner. The paper is of low grammage because it is the most suitable for the xylographic technique or for linoleum. If the paper were of higher grammage, it would present a more complex printing process, as it would have to be moistened. That that paper be chosen and stamped dry it is decisive for obtaining masses with different textures, which provide graphic richness to the print, the equivalent of the halftones of other techniques such as watercolor, pastel or oil. Although now only is preserved a pre-print for poster which can be considered original, they would have possibly made different prints in which the result would be different, until obtaining one with which the artist was satisfied. Once achieved, it would go to the printing press to carry out the photomechanics and its subsequent serial reproduction.

In a work of these characteristics, several factors must be taken into account that will determine the final result.

There is, on the one hand, the cleanliness in the execution of the carving. It will be determined by the perfection of the edges, as the print shows, where the artist will play with the straight lines of the composition. The approach is no longer modern or avant-garde but it will be revolutionary, a declaration of intentions, forceful as a demolition mace (pun intended) in the heart of We, at the center of the proposal itself. If the aesthetic and plastic approaches of Castelao respond to the curved line, to the Romanesque, to the baroque, to the profusion of vegetal forms, like scrolls that intertwine and seem to have no end, so inherent to the landscape and soul of Galicia; Mazas's proposal is going to be that of the straight line, that of synthesis, that of the angle. "That desire for the sinuous, for the twisted, that swamps Galicia in all its exhibitions, brings to the field of thought its most abundant baroque style.22. It was Mazas in the magazine We a stranger, constrained in middle of ruralista aesthetics, neo-medieval and nineteenth century of Castelao, or the decadence, modernism and plastic conservatism of Risco, expressed not only in the stage prior to We, in The Centuria, but also as a denier of the Mediterranean civilization23. Mazas, for his part, defines himself as a Greek from Minho24. It is curious that another distant figure from Mazas in time, such as José Ángel Valente, who is now trying to recover, from Galicia, from Orense, is also defined as Mediterranean25.

Looking closely at the stamp, it shows parts where the carving was not made deep enough - or the plate was deliberately not cut to make the stamping absolutely clean - as in the lines of the mountains, in the hand, in character's wand or hat. Mazas was interested in these types of fingerprints or inaccuracies, as were those that appear in the lower left corner achieved with less ink or insufficient pressure.

In this case, HE He made the stamp manually, not with a press or press, but by pressing with some very smooth and polished, heavy, slightly curved rounded stone that the artist could cover with his hand using it as a baren, or with a ladle (considering the size of the print). It would be the way in which he could better control the effects obtained by the greater or lesser amount of ink and by the greater or lesser pressure when stamping. This consideration is reinforced by the fact that the printing was done dry, and the fact that the grammage of the paper is low. If it had gotten wet, it would have been impossible to print it with that grammage and quality of paper, because it would have broken even though it had been protected with reserve paper. If it had been printed with a press, it would show the inevitable curling due to the change of state (dry-wet) when the angles of the plate act on the paper, and wrinkles may be created by pressure, by the direction of the paper fibers and if the press was press in the direction of the roller movement.

(Imag. 27)

The print has been made from several linoleum sheets, not just one. First because it is not easy (not even today)26 get one of such a large size, secondly, because there are some original Mazas linoleum sheets, even more than that is preserved Bearded man –The only one that was shown in the catalog of the Círculo de Bellas Artes in 2002–, specifically some swallows for the logo of “swallow”, Which are cropped. It is usually done this way so that there are no marks in the white areas on large inked areas. The only problem would be how to register the colors on the paper. In this case, as a single stamp is intended, the accuracy of the registration would not be important, and the reference marks would be made on the work table. As I mentioned before, there is a mark of this type (of shallow size, with its characteristic grooves), on the left stick descending from the N of We, (Imág. 27) because that “white” is obtained inside a plate, and if the artist wishes to obtain a clean surface, he would have to cut absolutely all the material. On the other hand, playing imperfections or randomness when printing is a subtle game that should not be abused. There must be contrast. If we have an area that is excessively typographed like the bottom right and with "failures" in the inking, or in the pressure exerted, and therefore in obtaining a mass of non-uniform color and not perfectly saturated like the one that would be obtained with a stencil or a serigraphy, but with the richness of nuances and imperfections and textures that the plate shows; the rest of the poster must be clean, hence the different elements are cut out.

Another argument that reinforces my opinion that the artist used several fragments to make the print – one for each color and not just one plate per color but several: one for red, two for green and two for black, being the fragment of the black, which represents the character's face and body, the largest – is that slight overlaps can be observed in the adjacent colors. Like the ones that the stamp shows of the green color of the mountain on the red of the character's hat, (Imág. 28) or the green on the black of the face or the red of the hat on the green and black of the face. (Imág.29) No matter how well the registration was done, there is always a small variation that brings happy or unpleasant surprises when lifting the paper. In this case the result is happy. The overlays give character to the print even when the green of the face has shifted a little with the pressure overflowing the straight edge of the plate towards the black color.

These small footprints allow us to know not only the technique that he used but also the way of stamping. In industrial procedures, you start by printing colors from lightest to darkest. Mazas did not do it like that, but stamping firstly the color black, then green and finally red, except in the case of the mountain green that overlaps the red of the hat and which would therefore be the last color to be stamped.

The engraving is very well executed. The lines that frame the stain are perfectly parallel to the edge of the paper. There is no dirt whatsoever in the areas that should go without ink, except, as has been said, for the descending stick of the N of We. There is a slight displacement of the plate in the lower left corner, which, being admitted by Mazas, can also be considered a graphic resource.

Regarding the composition, like The engraving is very well executed. The lines that frame the stain are perfectly parallel to the edge of the paper. There is no dirt whatsoever in the areas that should go without ink, except, as has been said, for the descending stick of the N ofImaginatively divide the rectangle into two halves by the diagonal that crosses the surface from the upper right corner to the lower left corner. The largest amount of mass, the largest amount of graphic elements, the fonts and the three colors used would be circumscribed in the right half of the print. Outside would be the white in which the different elements are based, the secondary diagonal of green color that reinforces the main diagonal (imaginary), drawing the mountain, and the logo of We, which would act as a counterpoint of balance, moving the focus of interest to the extremes of the lower right and upper left rectangle. The line that crosses the hand is the character's staff, but it is also a secondary diagonal that, if extended, would divide the second third –practically a golden section– the lower limit of the rectangle of the stamp, and which coincides with the same section in the upper limit with the vertex of the mountain. The second secondary diagonal, made up of the slope of the mountain that converges on the character's hat, if we extended it, would divide the second third –again very close to the golden section– the right limit of the print. These compositional elements are what give it its peculiar beauty and dynamism. Mazas arbitrates the compositional structure, not in such an obsessive way as Maruja Mallo, but with the intuitive eye of expert sensitivity. Although measurement and science in Mazas was very important,27 it is also the freshness and spontaneity that can disappear under the excessively measured and ruled.

it is also the freshness and spontaneity that can disappear under the excessively measured and ruled.

it is also the freshness and spontaneity that can disappear under the excessively measured and ruled.chored engraving”And its authorship as part of the text28. it is also the freshness and spontaneity that can disappear under the excessively measured and ruled. it is also the freshness and spontaneity that can disappear under the excessively measured and ruled. In favor of Mazas it plays that his name and surname with excessive letters is very difficult to use without being overloaded. Mazas solves it by synthesizing the letters, turning them into an anagram, but not for that cryptic, but perfectly legible. In the case of Klee, the spelling is much easier, since there are only four letters, two of them a repetition, as a sort of graphic alliteration, and another two that seem to have been taken on purpose from his lessons: one is a line and the other a sectioned line as a "divisible structure in its linear variation"29. No Klee signature is the same, it varies according to the painting, the drawing or the composition; It even comes to sign with the drawing of a clover, which is what Klee means in German, and is a significant part of the whole. Mazas signatures are never the same and many of them are also part of the composition. In the case of this print, the example is reliable, perhaps excessively modern for the architects of WePerhaps it shows an excessive self-confidence of the very young collaborator, perhaps the excessive prominence and size of the signature on the stamp was annoying. Mazas is not satisfied with a mere imprint, but his signature is included in the design.

(Imag. 31)

Mazas likes to run fonts manually. The apparent orientalism of the used by Mazas in the print for the poster of We, is nothing more than a way to graphically fill a certain surface. This resource will be used in various jobs, always adapting the font to its specific characteristics. As we can see on the cover of Xabier's book Vault The moon the soul and the beloved or in that of Wenceslao Fernández Flórez Immoral tale, already referred. In this case, yes the stamp is a song to the angle and the straight line, the typography will be in line. Small elements can be seen in all these works that ornamentally fill in the masses of color in which the fonts are inserted. They adapt to the graphic proposal and unload it with color, they also arbitrate the graphic rhythm. In the case of this stamp they are small triangles. On the covers of the two annotated books they are small, parallel rhomboids. In Xabier Bóveda's, typographical quotation marks –although all the typography is handmade–; because he is not going to arrange the letters on black but on white, in a much cleaner composition, less ornate. I can understand Mazas's fascination with manually creating fonts in a graphic way, that is, as if it were an illustration, since I myself have used that resource many years later, although with a different aesthetic. (Im.31)

(Im.31) (Im.31)30(Im.31) We (Im.31)

TRACEABILITY AND HYPOTHESIS

Was Mazas commissioned to produce a poster by the editors of We being this a young man? If we assume the date of the print to be between 1920 and 1923 – the date on which Teixeira's presence seems to be more assiduous in Galician publications – Mazas would be between 18 and 21 years old. And, either he was highly appreciated artistically or, it seems unlikely that he would have been commissioned with such an important task. Some other preparatory study is unknown, some other original for a poster to advertise the magazine. In any case, the artistic director was Castelao, and he himself was active, so the most plausible thing would be for him to take on the task. He could do it perfectly and his proposal would be absolutely within the aesthetic parameters of the magazine. Years later he made some posters for the campaign in favor of the Statute of Autonomy. The only reason that would prevent Castelao from having made the poster and therefore entrusting it to Mazas, would be that the need for its execution had coincided with the trip that Castelao made to Europe in 1921.

the artistic director was Castelao, and he himself was active, so the most plausible thing would be for him to take on the task. He could do it perfectly and his proposal would be absolutely within the aesthetic parameters of the magazine. Years later he made some posters for the campaign in favor of the Statute of Autonomy. The only reason that would prevent Castelao from having made the poster and therefore entrusting it to Mazas, would be that the need for its execution had coincided with the trip that Castelao made to Europe in 1921.

If you did not like it, it seems strange to give it to Teixeira who also does not stand out as an avant-garde or an appreciator of avant-garde aesthetics. Its organ of expression is The Eagle: traditionalism, religiosity, saudosismo, homeland, nation. The covers of his books are also like that, they refer to tradition, his own pictorial work also refers to it. The presence of artists who being so close, such as Amadeo de Sousa Cardoso –also Amarantino– is definitely far away for Teixeira. On the other hand, Mazas is much closer to Almada, with whom he coincides in Madrid in the social gatherings of Farm hayfield, or Amadeo de Sousa whom he glossed and whose mutual friends are the Delaunays.

Another hypothesis is that Candido, own motu, made the print for the poster, but that, given its avant-garde, he would not have liked and the poster would not have been made.

, made the print for the poster, but that, given its avant-garde, he would not have liked and the poster would not have been made.

, made the print for the poster, but that, given its avant-garde, he would not have liked and the poster would not have been made.

. No Klee signature is the same, it varies according to the painting, the drawing or the composition; It even comes to sign with the drawing of a clover, which is what Klee means in German, and is a significant part of the whole. Mazas signatures are never the same and many of them are also part of the composition.

There is also another question to be resolved. Y is the friction of one of the inner folds until it breaks. If the stamp was stored for a long time and if the fold was not handled, it would be very difficult for it to break, even for a piece of paper to disappear, no matter how low its quality.31, There is also another question to be resolved. Y is the friction of one of the inner folds until it breaks. If the stamp was stored for a long time and if the fold was not handled, it would be very difficult for it to break, even for a piece of paper to disappear, no matter how low its quality. so thatThere is also another question to be resolved. Y is the friction of one of the inner folds until it breaks. If the stamp was stored for a long time and if the fold was not handled, it would be very difficult for it to break, even for a piece of paper to disappear, no matter how low its quality.

There is no evidence that Mazas had any relationship with Teixeira. However, there are references to relationships that he could have had with Portuguese personalities and intellectuals. A book by the poet Alfredo Barata da Rocha is preserved in the Fernández Mazas collection, Flanders MistThere is no evidence that Mazas had any relationship with Teixeira. However, there are references to relationships that he could have had with Portuguese personalities and intellectuals. A book by the poet Alfredo Barata da Rocha is preserved in the Fernández Mazas collection,There is no evidence that Mazas had any relationship with Teixeira. However, there are references to relationships that he could have had with Portuguese personalities and intellectuals. A book by the poet Alfredo Barata da Rocha is preserved in the Fernández Mazas collection,There is no evidence that Mazas had any relationship with Teixeira. However, there are references to relationships that he could have had with Portuguese personalities and intellectuals. A book by the poet Alfredo Barata da Rocha is preserved in the Fernández Mazas collection, The Pueblo GallegoThere is no evidence that Mazas had any relationship with Teixeira. However, there are references to relationships that he could have had with Portuguese personalities and intellectuals. A book by the poet Alfredo Barata da Rocha is preserved in the Fernández Mazas collection, The Zarpa an illustration of C.F.M. accompanying a society note about a conference by the poet Antonio Nobre at the Liceo Recreo Orensano33. (Im.33) None of these Portuguese intellectuals with whom, in one way or another, Mazas had a relationship, and especially Teixeira de Pascoaes, could be considered avant-garde34That is why the finding and its nature are so surprising. To finish, but already in 1929, in the magazine that together with Johan Carballeira edited Mazas in Vigo Gaceta de Galicia; there is an article titled Portugal in Sight that appears in number 1 and in it Eça de Queiroz is referenced, but above all the painter and – to put it with a current term, “performer” – Guillerme Santa Rita. (Imág. 34, 35, 36) Artist close to futurism collaborated in the number 2 of the magazine Orpheu Artist close to futurism collaborated in the number 2 of the magazineArtist close to futurism collaborated in the number 2 of the magazineArtist close to futurism collaborated in the number 2 of the magazine Athena from Pessoa Artist close to futurism collaborated in the number 2 of the magazine Artist close to futurism collaborated in the number 2 of the magazineArtist close to futurism collaborated in the number 2 of the magazine. Artist close to futurism collaborated in the number 2 of the magazine

As for the Portuguese painters who appear in We, are closer to modernism than to the avant-garde, very far from the more contemporary, more attractive proposals –also Portuguese–, just the ones that Montes and Mazas were interested in. I mean, they fit perfectly. We, are closer to modernism than to the avant-garde, very far from the more contemporary, more attractive proposals –also Portuguese–, just the ones that Montes and Mazas were interested in. I mean, they fit perfectly. We , are closer to modernism than to the avant-garde, very far from the more contemporary, more attractive proposals –also Portuguese–, just the ones that Montes and Mazas were interested in. I mean, they fit perfectly., are closer to modernism than to the avant-garde, very far from the more contemporary, more attractive proposals –also Portuguese–, just the ones that Montes and Mazas were interested in. I mean, they fit perfectly., are closer to modernism than to the avant-garde, very far from the more contemporary, more attractive proposals –also Portuguese–, just the ones that Montes and Mazas were interested in. I mean, they fit perfectly. , are closer to modernism than to the avant-garde, very far from the more contemporary, more attractive proposals –also Portuguese–, just the ones that Montes and Mazas were interested in. I mean, they fit perfectly.

, are closer to modernism than to the avant-garde, very far from the more contemporary, more attractive proposals –also Portuguese–, just the ones that Montes and Mazas were interested in. I mean, they fit perfectly.
, are closer to modernism than to the avant-garde, very far from the more contemporary, more attractive proposals –also Portuguese–, just the ones that Montes and Mazas were interested in. I mean, they fit perfectly.

Regarding the relations with Portugal of the group of friends closest to Mazas, we could highlight apart from Montes himself, who had a position of cultural ambassador during the first years of the Franco dictatorship,38 to Álvaro de las Casas who traveled frequently to Portugal, who did not accept the position that Montes offered him as a cultural agent for the Francoists in 1938 and preferred to go into exile39, and that during the 1920s he maintained contact with many Portuguese intellectuals quite different from those that appear in relation to We, such as Julio de Lemos, Salvato Feijóo, Severino de Faria, Antonio de Magalhaes, Passos Lima, Joao Verde, Dionis Köpke, Juan Mimoso, Luciano Pereira da Silva, Serafín Neves, such as Julio de Lemos, Salvato Feijóo, Severino de Faria, Antonio de Magalhaes, Passos Lima, Joao Verde, Dionis Köpke, Juan Mimoso, Luciano Pereira da Silva, Serafín Neves, such as Julio de Lemos, Salvato Feijóo, Severino de Faria, Antonio de Magalhaes, Passos Lima, Joao Verde, Dionis Köpke, Juan Mimoso, Luciano Pereira da Silva, Serafín Neves The City of smiles , such as Julio de Lemos, Salvato Feijóo, Severino de Faria, Antonio de Magalhaes, Passos Lima, Joao Verde, Dionis Köpke, Juan Mimoso, Luciano Pereira da Silva, Serafín Neves Historical Institute of Minho, such as Julio de Lemos, Salvato Feijóo, Severino de Faria, Antonio de Magalhaes, Passos Lima, Joao Verde, Dionis Köpke, Juan Mimoso, Luciano Pereira da Silva, Serafín Neves , such as Julio de Lemos, Salvato Feijóo, Severino de Faria, Antonio de Magalhaes, Passos Lima, Joao Verde, Dionis Köpke, Juan Mimoso, Luciano Pereira da Silva, Serafín Neves

Álvaro de las Casas writes several letters to Teixeira de Pascoaes and, with the exception of the one he sends to him on May 31, 1923, in none of them does he refer to anything that has to do with art, much less with the stamp that is analyzed. I must point out that in 1931 Mazas distanced himself from him as a result of the facts of the Statute of Autonomy already mentioned. There was talk of Álvaro de las Casas as a possible civil governor, so the radicals from Orense sent a telegram to the Madrid press against Otero Pedrayo and de las Casas, accusing them of being reactionaries.Álvaro de las Casas writes several letters to Teixeira de Pascoaes and, with the exception of the one he sends to him on May 31, 1923, in none of them does he refer to anything that has to do with art, much less with the stamp that is analyzed. I must point out that in 1931 Mazas distanced himself from him as a result of the facts of the Statute of Autonomy already mentioned. There was talk of Álvaro de las Casas as a possible civil governor, so the radicals from Orense sent a telegram to the Madrid press against Otero Pedrayo and de las Casas, accusing them of being reactionaries.

Álvaro de las Casas writes several letters to Teixeira de Pascoaes and, with the exception of the one he sends to him on May 31, 1923, in none of them does he refer to anything that has to do with art, much less with the stamp that is analyzed. I must point out that in 1931 Mazas distanced himself from him as a result of the facts of the Statute of Autonomy already mentioned. There was talk of Álvaro de las Casas as a possible civil governor, so the radicals from Orense sent a telegram to the Madrid press against Otero Pedrayo and de las Casas, accusing them of being reactionaries. Álvaro de las Casas writes several letters to Teixeira de Pascoaes and, with the exception of the one he sends to him on May 31, 1923, in none of them does he refer to anything that has to do with art, much less with the stamp that is analyzed. I must point out that in 1931 Mazas distanced himself from him as a result of the facts of the Statute of Autonomy already mentioned. There was talk of Álvaro de las Casas as a possible civil governor, so the radicals from Orense sent a telegram to the Madrid press against Otero Pedrayo and de las Casas, accusing them of being reactionaries. together with the aforementioned Álvaro de las Casas or Eugenio Montes Álvaro de las Casas writes several letters to Teixeira de Pascoaes and, with the exception of the one he sends to him on May 31, 1923, in none of them does he refer to anything that has to do with art, much less with the stamp that is analyzed. I must point out that in 1931 Mazas distanced himself from him as a result of the facts of the Statute of Autonomy already mentioned. There was talk of Álvaro de las Casas as a possible civil governor, so the radicals from Orense sent a telegram to the Madrid press against Otero Pedrayo and de las Casas, accusing them of being reactionaries. –all of them very close to Cándido Fernández Mazas– who, before any of the Galician intellectuals, visited him in Amarante. But of the three, it is Bernárdez who, based on strictly documentary references, puts Teixeira in contact –indirectly– with the work of Mazas.

–all of them very close to Cándido Fernández Mazas– who, before any of the Galician intellectuals, visited him in Amarante. But of the three, it is Bernárdez who, based on strictly documentary references, puts Teixeira in contact –indirectly– with the work of Mazas.

–all of them very close to Cándido Fernández Mazas– who, before any of the Galician intellectuals, visited him in Amarante. But of the three, it is Bernárdez who, based on strictly documentary references, puts Teixeira in contact –indirectly– with the work of Mazas. Kindergarten–all of them very close to Cándido Fernández Mazas– who, before any of the Galician intellectuals, visited him in Amarante. But of the three, it is Bernárdez who, based on strictly documentary references, puts Teixeira in contact –indirectly– with the work of Mazas.–all of them very close to Cándido Fernández Mazas– who, before any of the Galician intellectuals, visited him in Amarante. But of the three, it is Bernárdez who, based on strictly documentary references, puts Teixeira in contact –indirectly– with the work of Mazas.–all of them very close to Cándido Fernández Mazas– who, before any of the Galician intellectuals, visited him in Amarante. But of the three, it is Bernárdez who, based on strictly documentary references, puts Teixeira in contact –indirectly– with the work of Mazas. Aesthetic Muiñeira–all of them very close to Cándido Fernández Mazas– who, before any of the Galician intellectuals, visited him in Amarante. But of the three, it is Bernárdez who, based on strictly documentary references, puts Teixeira in contact –indirectly– with the work of Mazas.–all of them very close to Cándido Fernández Mazas– who, before any of the Galician intellectuals, visited him in Amarante. But of the three, it is Bernárdez who, based on strictly documentary references, puts Teixeira in contact –indirectly– with the work of Mazas.. But the most definitive document, and in which there is no doubt that Teixeira sees a work by Mazas, is the letter dated November 17, 1923 in Dacón, and in which the description of the Mazas document goes unnoticed by researchers: “ Francisco Luis (Fair Caricature by FM) Bernárdez” . But the most definitive document, and in which there is no doubt that Teixeira sees a work by Mazas, is the letter dated November 17, 1923 in Dacón, and in which the description of the Mazas document goes unnoticed by researchers: “Francisco Luis (Caricature feita by FM) Bernárdez” letter in which he asks Teixeira if he received Kindergarten. But the most definitive document, and in which there is no doubt that Teixeira sees a work by Mazas, is the letter dated November 17, 1923 in Dacón, and in which the description of the Mazas document goes unnoticed by researchers: “Francisco Luis (Caricature feita by FM) Bernárdez”. But the most definitive document, and in which there is no doubt that Teixeira sees a work by Mazas, is the letter dated November 17, 1923 in Dacón, and in which the description of the Mazas document goes unnoticed by researchers: “Francisco Luis (Caricature feita by FM) Bernárdez”

Vicente Risco seems to be ruled out, due to the distance between him and Mazas. In the letters that he sends to Teixeira there are only mentions of the folk spirit, to the political or publishing field, to the sale and promotion of books, to propaganda, nothing related to art.

I see no problem in Mazas criticizing nationalism and at the same time illustrating books even though they were published in Nós –the only ones being those by Augusto Casas and the two by Eugenio Montes, apart from the one published in Celtic. But the most definitive document, and in which there is no doubt that Teixeira sees a work by Mazas, is the letter dated November 17, 1923 in Dacón, and in which the description of the Mazas document goes unnoticed by researchers: “ Francisco Luis (Fair Caricature by FM) Bernárdez”

Although the picture that is presented refers Mazas once again to Orense, and -apparently to the Generation WeAlthough the picture that is presented refers Mazas once again to Orense, and -apparently to the Although the picture that is presented refers Mazas once again to Orense, and -apparently to the


1 Although the picture that is presented refers Mazas once again to Orense, and -apparently to the mixed communications. Editorial Galaxia. Vigo, 1973.Op. cit. P. 110.

2 “….it was Nós, the nationalist magazine of Risco and Castelao, that established the chair, and it was not exactly in favor of <new art> and avant-garde, although it did not systematically exclude it from its pages. ” Graphic illustration in Galicia. Duen de Bux. Ourense 2011. Byeg.155).

3 A book of drawings by Cándido Fernández Mazas: Them. The Spain of Heraclius Fournier. Miguel Angel Gamonal Torres. Granada Art Notebooks. University of Granada No. 35. 2004. Pages. 149, 161.

4 Lucía Sánchez Saornil (1895-1970), journalist and poet. Also known by the pseudonym Luciano de San Saor. Author of the book Statuesque that was never published. Accompanying the American anarchist Emma Goldmann on her visit to Spain. magazine contributor Threshold that was never published. Accompanying the American anarchist Emma Goldmann on her visit to Spain. magazine contributor

5 that was never published. Accompanying the American anarchist Emma Goldmann on her visit to Spain. magazine contributorthat was never published. Accompanying the American anarchist Emma Goldmann on her visit to Spain. magazine contributor that was never published. Accompanying the American anarchist Emma Goldmann on her visit to Spain. magazine contributor that was never published. Accompanying the American anarchist Emma Goldmann on her visit to Spain. magazine contributor that was never published. Accompanying the American anarchist Emma Goldmann on her visit to Spain. magazine contributor Pthat was never published. Accompanying the American anarchist Emma Goldmann on her visit to Spain. magazine contributor

6 The only printing plates of Mazas that are preserved are those that were used to make the Book of Augusto Casas Mill of starsthat was never published. Accompanying the American anarchist Emma Goldmann on her visit to Spain. magazine contributor

7 The Galician intellectuals and Teixeira de Pascoaesthat was never published. Accompanying the American anarchist Emma Goldmann on her visit to Spain. magazine contributor

8 Correspondence. Manuel Antonio. Ed. Galaxy. Vigo, 1979. Pages 76 and 77. Letter from Vicente Risco to Manoel Antonio, September 14, 1920.

9 Tour Eiffel. Manuel Antonio. Ed. Galaxy. Vigo, 1979. Pages 76 and 77. Letter from Vicente Risco to Manoel Antonio, September 14, 1920. . Manuel Antonio. Ed. Galaxy. Vigo, 1979. Pages 76 and 77. Letter from Vicente Risco to Manoel Antonio, September 14, 1920.

10 . Manuel Antonio. Ed. Galaxy. Vigo, 1979. Pages 76 and 77. Letter from Vicente Risco to Manoel Antonio, September 14, 1920. the components of the group gathered at that time around Don Vicente Risco, I did not listen to him again, neither to Don Vicente nor to Prego nor to Trabazos the components of the group gathered at that time around Don Vicente Risco, I did not listen to him again, neither to Don Vicente nor to Prego nor tothe components of the group gathered at that time around Don Vicente Risco, I did not listen to him again, neither to Don Vicente nor to Prego nor to the components of the group gathered at that time around Don Vicente Risco, I did not listen to him again, neither to Don Vicente nor to Prego nor to Anthological exhibition catalog on the centenary of his birth. Circle of Fine Arts Madrid, 2002. Anthological exhibition catalog on the centenary of his birth. Circle of Fine Arts Madrid, 2002. 13.

11Anthological exhibition catalog on the centenary of his birth. Circle of Fine Arts Madrid, 2002. Anthological exhibition catalog on the centenary of his birth. Circle of Fine Arts Madrid, 2002. dAnthological exhibition catalog on the centenary of his birth. Circle of Fine Arts Madrid, 2002. Anthological exhibition catalog on the centenary of his birth. Circle of Fine Arts Madrid, 2002.

12 Cándido Fernández Mazas. Vignette announcing Aguas de Mondaríz. Revista Nós nº 16. February 1, 1923. The fact that it was not signed by Mazas and the scrupulous respect for his decision (see note nº 28) meant that it was not included in the "Canonical Catalog" of 2002. There was consultation by María Victoria Carballo Calero to include her in “The illustration in the magazine Nós” in its new edition of 2011. There was agreement, despite the fact that Mª Victoria had opted for its authorship as early as 1983, although without arguing why.

13 Candido F. Mazas. Vella arch. We, No. 14. Ourense, 1922.

14 “In the Diputación de Orense a canvas made in Paris was exhibited. The plethora of criticizing and retrograde literature went to see the painting, a magnificent nude with a post-impressionist flavor, with the desire to "remove light" (...) The most prestigious of those intellectuals launched before the canvas, which "Window to the field" he was nicknamed a Christmas carol of academic consecration. That nude, physiological like the best of the Renaissance, broke the “cubist” starch in which its author lived imprisoned by the art of literary gossip.” “In the Diputación de Orense a canvas made in Paris was exhibited. The plethora of criticizing and retrograde literature went to see the painting, a magnificent nude with a post-impressionist flavor, with the desire to "remove light" (...) The most prestigious of those intellectuals launched before the canvas, which "Window to the field" he was nicknamed a Christmas carol of academic consecration. That nude, physiological like the best of the Renaissance, broke the “cubist” starch in which its author lived imprisoned by the art of literary gossip.” “In the Diputación de Orense a canvas made in Paris was exhibited. The plethora of criticizing and retrograde literature went to see the painting, a magnificent nude with a post-impressionist flavor, with the desire to "remove light" (...) The most prestigious of those intellectuals launched before the canvas, which "Window to the field" he was nicknamed a Christmas carol of academic consecration. That nude, physiological like the best of the Renaissance, broke the “cubist” starch in which its author lived imprisoned by the art of literary gossip.” “In the Diputación de Orense a canvas made in Paris was exhibited. The plethora of criticizing and retrograde literature went to see the painting, a magnificent nude with a post-impressionist flavor, with the desire to "remove light" (...) The most prestigious of those intellectuals launched before the canvas, which "Window to the field" he was nicknamed a Christmas carol of academic consecration. That nude, physiological like the best of the Renaissance, broke the “cubist” starch in which its author lived imprisoned by the art of literary gossip.”

15 “In the Diputación de Orense a canvas made in Paris was exhibited. The plethora of criticizing and retrograde literature went to see the painting, a magnificent nude with a post-impressionist flavor, with the desire to "remove light" (...) The most prestigious of those intellectuals launched before the canvas, which "Window to the field" he was nicknamed a Christmas carol of academic consecration. That nude, physiological like the best of the Renaissance, broke the “cubist” starch in which its author lived imprisoned by the art of literary gossip.” Naked. We No. 31. July 25, 1926.

16 No. 31. July 25, 1926. Immoral AccountNo. 31. July 25, 1926. TheyNo. 31. July 25, 1926.

17 “Outside of Galicia, the development of posters by Galician authors was closer to the avant-garde concerns that the years of the Republic shocked all Spanish art. This is the case of the poster made by Cándido Fernández Mazas for the theater of the Pedagogical Missions in 1934. It is a simple design of bright colors with the theme of the wink: his drawing expresses, in the refined sensitivity of its lines, a poetic force that emerges from all the plastic work of this artist from Ourense. It is unfortunate that his work in this field is so limited in his graphic design. ” Maria Luisa Nephew Poster Design in Galicia“Outside of Galicia, the development of posters by Galician authors was closer to the avant-garde concerns that the years of the Republic shocked all Spanish art. This is the case of the poster made by Cándido Fernández Mazas for the theater of the Pedagogical Missions in 1934. It is a simple design of bright colors with the theme of the wink: his drawing expresses, in the refined sensitivity of its lines, a poetic force that emerges from all the plastic work of this artist from Ourense. It is unfortunate that his work in this field is so limited in his graphic design. ” “Outside of Galicia, the development of posters by Galician authors was closer to the avant-garde concerns that the years of the Republic shocked all Spanish art. This is the case of the poster made by Cándido Fernández Mazas for the theater of the Pedagogical Missions in 1934. It is a simple design of bright colors with the theme of the wink: his drawing expresses, in the refined sensitivity of its lines, a poetic force that emerges from all the plastic work of this artist from Ourense. It is unfortunate that his work in this field is so limited in his graphic design. ”“Outside of Galicia, the development of posters by Galician authors was closer to the avant-garde concerns that the years of the Republic shocked all Spanish art. This is the case of the poster made by Cándido Fernández Mazas for the theater of the Pedagogical Missions in 1934. It is a simple design of bright colors with the theme of the wink: his drawing expresses, in the refined sensitivity of its lines, a poetic force that emerges from all the plastic work of this artist from Ourense. It is unfortunate that his work in this field is so limited in his graphic design. ”

18 “Outside of Galicia, the development of posters by Galician authors was closer to the avant-garde concerns that the years of the Republic shocked all Spanish art. This is the case of the poster made by Cándido Fernández Mazas for the theater of the Pedagogical Missions in 1934. It is a simple design of bright colors with the theme of the wink: his drawing expresses, in the refined sensitivity of its lines, a poetic force that emerges from all the plastic work of this artist from Ourense. It is unfortunate that his work in this field is so limited in his graphic design. ” . But the most definitive document, and in which there is no doubt that Teixeira sees a work by Mazas, is the letter dated November 17, 1923 in Dacón, and in which the description of the Mazas document goes unnoticed by researchers: “ Francisco Luis (Fair Caricature by FM) Bernárdez” . But the most definitive document, and in which there is no doubt that Teixeira sees a work by Mazas, is the letter dated November 17, 1923 in Dacón, and in which the description of the Mazas document goes unnoticed by researchers: “ Francisco Luis (Fair Caricature by FM) Bernárdez”. But the most definitive document, and in which there is no doubt that Teixeira sees a work by Mazas, is the letter dated November 17, 1923 in Dacón, and in which the description of the Mazas document goes unnoticed by researchers: “ Francisco Luis (Fair Caricature by FM) Bernárdez” It is from November 15, 1973, also in the newspaper La Región. It is a historical paradox that it is Emilio Canda, who in the 1970s spoke of Mazas when he was one of the Falangist editors of The Region, 1973. Luis Trabazo's Response is from November 15, 1973. Historical paradox that it is Emilio Canda, who in the 1970s spoke of Mazas when he was one of the Falangist editors of It is from November 15, 1973, also in the newspaper La Región. It is a historical paradox that it is Emilio Canda, who in the 1970s spoke of Mazas when he was one of the Falangist editors of The Zarpa: “Another decisive person in the newspaper and who appears as the founder in the second stage was the journalist from Ribada Emilio CandaThe Region, 1973. Luis Trabazo's Response is from November 15, 1973. Historical paradox that it is Emilio Canda, who in the 1970s spoke of Mazas when he was one of the Falangist editors of The Region, 1973. Luis Trabazo's Response is from November 15, 1973. Historical paradox that it is Emilio Canda, who in the 1970s spoke of Mazas when he was one of the Falangist editors of The Region, 1973. Luis Trabazo's Response is from November 15, 1973. Historical paradox that it is Emilio Canda, who in the 1970s spoke of Mazas when he was one of the Falangist editors ofThe Region, 1973. Luis Trabazo's Response is from November 15, 1973. Historical paradox that it is Emilio Canda, who in the 1970s spoke of Mazas when he was one of the Falangist editors of

Mazas was rather a brilliant illustrator whose work was not up to par with the literature of his friends, except perhaps for Augusto Casas y Montes It is from November 15, 1973, also in the newspaper La Región. It is a historical paradox that it is Emilio Canda, who in the 1970s spoke of Mazas when he was one of the Falangist editors of It is from November 15, 1973, also in the newspaper La Región. It is a historical paradox that it is Emilio Canda, who in the 1970s spoke of Mazas when he was one of the Falangist editors of

19 The Region, 1973. Luis Trabazo's Response is from November 15, 1973. Historical paradox that it is Emilio Canda, who in the 1970s spoke of Mazas when he was one of the Falangist editors of Vignette announcing Aguas de MondarízThe Region, 1973. Luis Trabazo's Response is from November 15, 1973. Historical paradox that it is Emilio Canda, who in the 1970s spoke of Mazas when he was one of the Falangist editors of

20 “….he enlivened his desire with the stigma of mystery, enclosing his body in the hermetic disguise that Fantomas adopted in his series of cinematographic adventures.” “….he enlivened his desire with the stigma of mystery, enclosing his body in the hermetic disguise that Fantomas adopted in his series of cinematographic adventures.” Notes for a biography of Cándido Fernández Mazas. Anthological exhibition catalog on the centenary of his birth. Circle of Fine Arts Madrid, 2002. “….he enlivened his desire with the stigma of mystery, enclosing his body in the hermetic disguise that Fantomas adopted in his series of cinematographic adventures.”

21 “….he enlivened his desire with the stigma of mystery, enclosing his body in the hermetic disguise that Fantomas adopted in his series of cinematographic adventures.”

22 “….he enlivened his desire with the stigma of mystery, enclosing his body in the hermetic disguise that Fantomas adopted in his series of cinematographic adventures.”

23 “….he enlivened his desire with the stigma of mystery, enclosing his body in the hermetic disguise that Fantomas adopted in his series of cinematographic adventures.”

24 Cándido Fernández Mazas. The Last Frac of a Volterian“….he enlivened his desire with the stigma of mystery, enclosing his body in the hermetic disguise that Fantomas adopted in his series of cinematographic adventures.” Anthological exhibition catalog on the centenary of his birth. Circle of Fine Arts Madrid, 2002. “….he enlivened his desire with the stigma of mystery, enclosing his body in the hermetic disguise that Fantomas adopted in his series of cinematographic adventures.”

25 “….he enlivened his desire with the stigma of mystery, enclosing his body in the hermetic disguise that Fantomas adopted in his series of cinematographic adventures.” teacher in his dedication in the Seven songs from Beyond, referred to him, because although well aware that the city with the “mowed thread”, prevented knowing, knowing, identifying with the true referents, those that should be coherent for someone who published in Iberian Wheel, or that he was one of the first to take a stand against the Castro dictatorship because of his friendship with Lezama Lima or Calvert Casey. He reconstructed the thread as best he could, as we have all done. Better Risco, of course, than Otero Pedrayo, whom he hated intellectually and aesthetically. Without embargo Several things should be noted. The first that a painter as essential to Valente in the gestation of his own work as Paul Klee is, for Risco, a reason for ridicule as he leaves written in the fragments of Central EuropeSeveral things should be noted. The first that a painter as essential to Valente in the gestation of his own work as Paul Klee is, for Risco, a reason for ridicule as he leaves written in the fragments of Flower eater Several things should be noted. The first that a painter as essential to Valente in the gestation of his own work as Paul Klee is, for Risco, a reason for ridicule as he leaves written in the fragments of We Several things should be noted. The first that a painter as essential to Valente in the gestation of his own work as Paul Klee is, for Risco, a reason for ridicule as he leaves written in the fragments ofIt is a small notebook where on a black background like a school blackboard, it is stylized with very fine white and red queens. A kind of beast that if you don't know if it's a fox or a pig, among a mass of flowers. Flower eater It is a small notebook where on a black background like a school blackboard, it is stylized with very fine white and red queens. A kind of beast that if you don't know if it's a fox or a pig, among a mass of flowers.

The second is that Risco was never an avant-garde (not even during his stage as a dilettante) but quite the opposite, as can be seen in his correspondence with Manuel Antonio (Op. Cit. In this same article, page 4). The third that, in an article by Risco published in The region The second is that Risco was never an avant-garde (not even during his stage as a dilettante) but quite the opposite, as can be seen in his correspondence with Manuel Antonio (Op. Cit. In this same article, page 4). The third that, in an article by Risco published in The Modern CafeThe second is that Risco was never an avant-garde (not even during his stage as a dilettante) but quite the opposite, as can be seen in his correspondence with Manuel Antonio (Op. Cit. In this same article, page 4). The third that, in an article by Risco published in Anonymous Diary,(Galaxia-Gutenberg/Círculo de Lectores, 2011) P. 212. although in a completely different way –and masterfully, of course–, in the entry dated April 25, 1981, that is to say thirty years later and dedicated to Manuel Luis Acuña (someone from the generation of Mazas). It is at the end of that article in Risco that he talks about Fernández Mazas, as one more among all those he mentions. That this name -which belonged to one of the illustrators of The Zarpa ,(Galaxia-Gutenberg/Círculo de Lectores, 2011) P. 212. although in a completely different way –and masterfully, of course–, in the entry dated April 25, 1981, that is to say thirty years later and dedicated to Manuel Luis Acuña (someone from the generation of Mazas). It is at the end of that article in Risco that he talks about Fernández Mazas, as one more among all those he mentions. That this name -which belonged to one of the illustrators of

The alleged recovery of Risco for modern art and the avant-garde, which should have taken place around 1952 with the article he wrote about Antonio Saura, whom he did not get to know personally but through the painter's friendship with Valente. The letter that Saura writes to Risco thanking him for an article that he would have written about an exhibition of his and that the orensano polygraph receives in March 1952 is well known. But in another article published in the newspaper The region, titled Gatherings-focus The alleged recovery of Risco for modern art and the avant-garde, which should have taken place around 1952 with the article he wrote about Antonio Saura, whom he did not get to know personally but through the painter's friendship with Valente. The letter that Saura writes to Risco thanking him for an article that he would have written about an exhibition of his and that the orensano polygraph receives in March 1952 is well known. But in another article published in the newspaper conaisseur of art. And he says of himself that he "was even more doctrinaire", although it is not very well known what he means. He cites Tzará whom Mazas had met in Paris and Risco knew, but he is silent. In short, he writes himself evidencing his shortcomings and avoiding recognizing Mazas as everything he had been. And above all he claims for We "All that movement" of art. And he says of himself that he "was even more doctrinaire", although it is not very well known what he means. He cites Tzará whom Mazas had met in Paris and Risco knew, but he is silent. In short, he writes himself evidencing his shortcomings and avoiding recognizing Mazas as everything he had been. And above all he claims for

26 In the main houses specializing in the sale of engraving products, the largest area of ​​linoleum they serve –and they consider it extra– has dimensions of 50 x 70 cm. But until not long ago it did not exist in such a large size, being the largest that could be obtained 33 x 50cm. Measurements as we see, lower than those of the print that is being analyzed.

27 In the main houses specializing in the sale of engraving products, the largest area of ​​linoleum they serve –and they consider it extra– has dimensions of 50 x 70 cm. But until not long ago it did not exist in such a large size, being the largest that could be obtained 33 x 50cm. Measurements as we see, lower than those of the print that is being analyzed.In the main houses specializing in the sale of engraving products, the largest area of ​​linoleum they serve –and they consider it extra– has dimensions of 50 x 70 cm. But until not long ago it did not exist in such a large size, being the largest that could be obtained 33 x 50cm. Measurements as we see, lower than those of the print that is being analyzed. Of surrealism as a complementIn the main houses specializing in the sale of engraving products, the largest area of ​​linoleum they serve –and they consider it extra– has dimensions of 50 x 70 cm. But until not long ago it did not exist in such a large size, being the largest that could be obtained 33 x 50cm. Measurements as we see, lower than those of the print that is being analyzed.

28 “We noted that Mazas took special care in signing (…) –usually he did not sign his drawings–. And yes, only those who were satisfied with its result... If any work –whether literary or artistic– did not reach, in his estimation, a sufficient category, or was considered as a note or sketch or project of a new interpretation, then it was not signed. The signature meant for him the definitive consideration.” “We noted that Mazas took special care in signing (…) –usually he did not sign his drawings–. And yes, only those who were satisfied with its result... If any work –whether literary or artistic– did not reach, in his estimation, a sufficient category, or was considered as a note or sketch or project of a new interpretation, then it was not signed. The signature meant for him the definitive consideration.” Aesthetics Fernández Mazas. that was never published. Accompanying the American anarchist Emma Goldmann on her visit to Spain. magazine contributor “We noted that Mazas took special care in signing (…) –usually he did not sign his drawings–. And yes, only those who were satisfied with its result... If any work –whether literary or artistic– did not reach, in his estimation, a sufficient category, or was considered as a note or sketch or project of a new interpretation, then it was not signed. The signature meant for him the definitive consideration.” P “We noted that Mazas took special care in signing (…) –usually he did not sign his drawings–. And yes, only those who were satisfied with its result... If any work –whether literary or artistic– did not reach, in his estimation, a sufficient category, or was considered as a note or sketch or project of a new interpretation, then it was not signed. The signature meant for him the definitive consideration.”

29 “We noted that Mazas took special care in signing (…) –usually he did not sign his drawings–. And yes, only those who were satisfied with its result... If any work –whether literary or artistic– did not reach, in his estimation, a sufficient category, or was considered as a note or sketch or project of a new interpretation, then it was not signed. The signature meant for him the definitive consideration.” Pedagogical sketchbook“We noted that Mazas took special care in signing (…) –usually he did not sign his drawings–. And yes, only those who were satisfied with its result... If any work –whether literary or artistic– did not reach, in his estimation, a sufficient category, or was considered as a note or sketch or project of a new interpretation, then it was not signed. The signature meant for him the definitive consideration.” “We noted that Mazas took special care in signing (…) –usually he did not sign his drawings–. And yes, only those who were satisfied with its result... If any work –whether literary or artistic– did not reach, in his estimation, a sufficient category, or was considered as a note or sketch or project of a new interpretation, then it was not signed. The signature meant for him the definitive consideration.”

30 S. family from Guimarâes and settled in Porto. According to the reference of the gallery owner who has provided the print, if that is the origin of it.

31 “…Pascoaes, the great loner of Marâo, would never set foot in Galicia for reasons related, on the one hand, with his personality, the enemy of free exhibitions and, above all, for reasons of loyalty to all his friends: being asked by correspondents from ideological quarters in open confrontation, as we see from the letters, yielding to the invitation of one group would have meant betraying the other and intensifying the hiatus of an already evident division between them.” The Galician intellectuals and Teixeira de Pascoaes. Epistolario. Eloísa Álvarez and Isaac Alonso Estraviz. Editions of the Castro. Sada, 1999, p. 25.

There is no evidence that Mazas had any relationship with Teixeira. However, there are references to relationships that he could have had with Portuguese personalities and intellectuals. A book by the poet Alfredo Barata da Rocha is preserved in the Fernández Mazas collection, . Eloísa Álvarez and Isaac Alonso Estraviz. Editions of the Castro. Sada, 1999, p. 25.robes . Eloísa Álvarez and Isaac Alonso Estraviz. Editions of the Castro. Sada, 1999, p. 25. Renaissance. Eloísa Álvarez and Isaac Alonso Estraviz. Editions of the Castro. Sada, 1999, p. 25.

33 The Zarpa . Eloísa Álvarez and Isaac Alonso Estraviz. Editions of the Castro. Sada, 1999, p. 25.

34 . Eloísa Álvarez and Isaac Alonso Estraviz. Editions of the Castro. Sada, 1999, p. 25. with Portugal despite having written Mazas about Santa Rita, an article to which I will refer in the following note, despite the fact that Bonet knew him for having reviewed it in his Dictionary of the Vanguards in Spain 1907–1936. Juan Manuel Bonet. PORTUGAL–SPAIN 1900-1936: PLASTIC ARTS. 1 SOUTHWEST. Literary and artistic relations between Portugal and Spain (1890-1936). Literary and artistic relationships between Portugal and Spain (1890-1936). Exhibition catalog Southwest, held at the MEIAC in Badajoz in 2010. SECC/MEIAC, 2010. Page 46.

Artist close to futurism collaborated in the number 2 of the magazine “The anarchy lasted many years; it was necessary to destroy everything. Santa Rita with her clown costumes, with her clown costumes, walked her anarchy through Lisbon. She came from culture, she came from civilization, she came from Paris. (…) Santa Rita returned to Paris. Many anecdotes are told about her time in Montparnasse… But it was already late; the neurasthenia of his blagues had overpowered him (…) At the Café Du Dôme, he many times showed his companions a Florentine dagger that always accompanied him. With hallucinated eyes, with smiling eyes, half in jest, half seriously, Santa Rita said that she was bringing that dagger to assassinate Pablo Ruíz Picasso”In the main houses specializing in the sale of engraving products, the largest area of ​​linoleum they serve –and they consider it extra– has dimensions of 50 x 70 cm. But until not long ago it did not exist in such a large size, being the largest that could be obtained 33 x 50cm. Measurements as we see, lower than those of the print that is being analyzed. Portugal in sight. Revista de Galicia nº 1. Vigo, August 4, 1929.

Artist close to futurism collaborated in the number 2 of the magazine . Revista de Galicia nº 1. Vigo, August 4, 1929. ATHENA. Revista de Galicia nº 1. Vigo, August 4, 1929.. Revista de Galicia nº 1. Vigo, August 4, 1929. journalism by Fernández Mazas. Revista de Galicia nº 1. Vigo, August 4, 1929.

, are closer to modernism than to the avant-garde, very far from the more contemporary, more attractive proposals –also Portuguese–, just the ones that Montes and Mazas were interested in. I mean, they fit perfectly. . Revista de Galicia nº 1. Vigo, August 4, 1929. . Revista de Galicia nº 1. Vigo, August 4, 1929. . Revista de Galicia nº 1. Vigo, August 4, 1929.

38 “…of the dialogue of the first Franco regime –one of whose cultural representatives in Lisbon would certainly be the ex–ultraist Eugenio Montes–“ Juan Manuel Bonet. (op.cit) PORTUGAL–SPAIN 1900-1936: PLASTIC ARTS“…of the dialogue of the first Franco regime –one of whose cultural representatives in Lisbon would certainly be the ex–ultraist Eugenio Montes–“ Juan Manuel Bonet. (op.cit)

39 Eugene Montes. Letter addressed to Álvaro de las Casas on October 2, 1938 from the Hotel Cristina in Seville. The letter is sent to his address in Foz do Douro, O Porto. And it is in it where –as already mentioned in another writing– Eugenio Montes offers Álvaro a position in the new order as a cultural agent. It seems that Álvaro should not have accepted, since he ended up going into exile. I don't know if anything that Montes commissioned him appeared in the Portuguese press. I put in quotation marks some of the most interesting paragraphs of said letter: “In La Coruña I spoke several times on the radio, at the request of the military. A few days in Orense – Risco, knowing that I was there, called me from Allariz, and we talked like in the old days” (….) “I had the opportunity to speak with General Franco, who received me with an affectionate kindness that I will never forget… He entrusted me with certain missions that are what make me reside in Seville” (…) “We must be in contact. Tell me what you want done, specifying things. In any case, be calm and cheerful, everything will be for the best. Of José Antonio we know that he lives. He thinks a little about the Lisbon Institute and writes me some pages in favor of cultural relations between Spain and Portugal, which now can and should be intense. No one better than you can suggest projects in this regard. Here I am, I'm the same as always, your best friend,

Eugene Montes.

Eugene Montes.

, such as Julio de Lemos, Salvato Feijóo, Severino de Faria, Antonio de Magalhaes, Passos Lima, Joao Verde, Dionis Köpke, Juan Mimoso, Luciano Pereira da Silva, Serafín Neves Eugene Montes. Eugene Montes.Eugene Montes.

Álvaro de las Casas writes several letters to Teixeira de Pascoaes and, with the exception of the one he sends to him on May 31, 1923, in none of them does he refer to anything that has to do with art, much less with the stamp that is analyzed. I must point out that in 1931 Mazas distanced himself from him as a result of the facts of the Statute of Autonomy already mentioned. There was talk of Álvaro de las Casas as a possible civil governor, so the radicals from Orense sent a telegram to the Madrid press against Otero Pedrayo and de las Casas, accusing them of being reactionaries. Eugene Montes.

–all of them very close to Cándido Fernández Mazas– who, before any of the Galician intellectuals, visited him in Amarante. But of the three, it is Bernárdez who, based on strictly documentary references, puts Teixeira in contact –indirectly– with the work of Mazas. Eugene Montes. Eugene Montes.Eugene Montes.

–all of them very close to Cándido Fernández Mazas– who, before any of the Galician intellectuals, visited him in Amarante. But of the three, it is Bernárdez who, based on strictly documentary references, puts Teixeira in contact –indirectly– with the work of Mazas. "This month I will be sending you new and mature books from here. Among them, the "Aesthetics of the muiñeira" by the Galician Euxenio Montes ". The Galician intellectuals and Teixeira de Pascoaes. Epistolary. "This month I will be sending you new and mature books from here. Among them, the "Aesthetics of the muiñeira" by the Galician Euxenio Montes ". The Galician intellectuals and Teixeira de Pascoaes. Epistolary.

. But the most definitive document, and in which there is no doubt that Teixeira sees a work by Mazas, is the letter dated November 17, 1923 in Dacón, and in which the description of the Mazas document goes unnoticed by researchers: “Francisco Luis (Caricature feita by FM) Bernárdez” "This month I will be sending you new and mature books from here. Among them, the "Aesthetics of the muiñeira" by the Galician Euxenio Montes ". The Galician intellectuals and Teixeira de Pascoaes. Epistolary.

Illustration Day 2020:
Cándido Fernández Mazas


On Enlightenment 2020 we pay tribute to the illustrator, artist and writer from Ourense, Cándido Fernández Mazas. With this short video we review his life and work.
A production of PUFA and the Department of Cultural Policy of the Government of Galicia
Screenplay: Alberto Guitián
Animation and video: Martín Romero, Isabel Vila
Music: ‘Gnossienne n.º 1’, by Erik Satie, by Roberto Casteleiro
More information on www.diadailustracion.gal

Biography

Cándido Fernández Mazas - "harmonious multi-skilled individual" - in the words of Carlos Gurméndez, belongs to the young generation, born in the twentieth century, they die prematurely. For different geographical and personal avatars have remained in the shadows of history. Your life will pass couple to the evolution and the determining events of his century.

Continue reading “Biography”

Cándido Fernández Mazas. Los dibujos de París. 1925-1927
José Manuel Bouzas

"Here he suffers a brain under the heat of a star. Shortly before the catastrophe is released into the work. It develops here a profound tragedy; It is a tragedy, exemplary, a tragedy of nature. "

816. Diarios. Paul Klee.

Before the work of Cándido Fernández Mazas struggle in me two sentiments. A portion loyalty and gratitude to those few lines of plastic or literary expression, remembering, -and therefore impidiendo- immersion into oblivion, his death, his disappearance from memory, time and history. And on the other, the jealous custody intend to exercise over the wound site by indiscriminate and tendentious unwholesome, public and hopelessly looks.

Continue readingCándido Fernández Mazas. Los dibujos de París. 1925-1927
José Manuel Bouzas